Xliff Compare & Finding Missing Translations

When working with Extensions I would not recommend working with Xliff files unless you design for AppSource. Otherwise CaptionML will work fine for Per-Tenant projects.

Unfortunately for me, I am working right now on submitting an AppSource project and I need to evaluate if my translations are complete.

As I explained at my presentation in Antwerp at NAVTechDays we continue to code in C/Side and then convert to Extensions and submit to AppSource. Therefor I don’t have the nightmare problem of maintaining Xliff files, I do however need to figure out how complete I am.

So in C/Side I am using CaptionML and when I convert to Extensions I simply use this flag in our converter which I have and you don’t. (Nananana…)

ForNAV Converter

We’ll change that soon. But meanwhile let’s look at the output.

Translation

You don’t need to be a rocket scientist to see that for example Czech and Swedish probably have missing captions. But which ones?

Michael has created a simple C# console application that will generate a file you can open in Excel to analyse this.

Result

You can download the tool from our GitHub. Don’t hesitate to make improvements.

https://github.com/ReportsForNAV/xliffCompare

Stay tuned for more info and learnings with Extensions, AppSource and converting code…

4 thoughts on “Xliff Compare & Finding Missing Translations

  1. Frédéric Vercaemst

    Hi Mark,

    How would you advise treating captions for traditional ISV’s, not aiming for AppSource? We as an ISV deliver a W1 product, which is further localised and translated by local partners. So seems like XLIFF is the only option (if we don’t maintain all languages ourselves / expose our AL code to partners). Any insights if MS is improving the XLIFF experience?

    PS: Any plans on when the Reports ForNAV Converter will be publicly available to give it a test run?

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  2. Andreas Sippel

    To handle and maintain xliff files you can also use our free synXLIFF app for Business Central (https://www.synalis.de/synxliff/).

    With the help of synXLIFF you can:
    – import xliff files and view them in a structured way
    – identify missing translations
    – add or change translations
    – define default translations (which allows you to automatically translate terms in imported xliff files)
    – export the updated xliff file

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